Practice safe design: Use a concept.
       — Petrula Vrontikis

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In April 1985 New Coke was introduced in the US
after blind taste tests showed
that American consumers overwhelmingly preferred its taste.
The launch was a disaster
as consumers rejected the new product's taste
once it was presented in Coca-Cola's packaging

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We first learned to satisfy consumers’ needs. Then we realised more was
needed so we strived to delight consumers. Now that too is not enough ...
... consumers need to love the brand.
Saatchi & Saatchi researched “What makes some brands inspirational,
while others struggle?”
They came up with the answer:
Lovemarks: the future beyond brands
[READ MORE]
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Well done if you do.
But have you ever wondered how and why the recycling symbol was created.
It was designed in 1970 by Gary Anderson as an entry into a design competition.

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If you have ever looked at the bottom of a plastic bottle
you may have noticed the triangle symbol with a number in it.
This symbol is important to plastic recyclers to identify
the type of plastic of the packaging.
[READ MORE]

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Home | Tropicana
Tropicana

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Tropicana's rebranding debacle did more than create a customer-relations fiasco. It hit the brand in the wallet. When Tropicana tried to change things up, customers revolted, and they lost a fifth of their sales in a matter of weeks. 

When a brand undergoes a major re-design it usually signals increased marketing expenditure and leads to improved performance, at least in the short term. It gets people to look at the brand again and brings some kind of news and excitement around the brand. Tropicana had certainly sought to create excitement around the Pure Premium rebrand, announcing on Jan. 8 2009 a "historic integrated-marketing and advertising campaign ... designed to reinforce the brand and product attributes, rejuvenate the category and help consumers rediscover the health benefits they get from drinking America's iconic orange-juice brand."

However following the launch of the new pack, sales for their premium orange juice dropped 20%, roughly $33 million, to $137 million between Jan. 1 and Feb. 22 2009. Moreover, several of Tropicana's competitors appear to have benefited from the misstep, notably Minute Maid. On Feb. 23 2009, the company announced it would bow to consumer demand and scrap the new packaging ....... It had been on the market less than two months.

When changing packaging you have to be careful not to lose the essence of your brand. In this case a complete redesign of the logo and visuals made it hard for consumers to find their preferred brand. Tropicana took on the look of a generic house brand. After just two months Tropicana went back to their original packaging.

Luckily a recent redesign proves they’ve learned from their mistake without losing the guts to innovate. In fact this recent redesign for the pure premium orange juice is a massive change. Tropicana has opted for a transparent PET bottle with some interesting relevant features improving the customer experience significantly such as easy opening and pouring.
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