When the water starts boiling it is foolish to turn off the heat
- Nelson mandela

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In April 1985 New Coke was introduced in the US
after blind taste tests showed
that American consumers overwhelmingly preferred its taste.
The launch was a disaster
as consumers rejected the new product's taste
once it was presented in Coca-Cola's packaging

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We first learned to satisfy consumers’ needs. Then we realised more was
needed so we strived to delight consumers. Now that too is not enough ...
... consumers need to love the brand.
Saatchi & Saatchi researched “What makes some brands inspirational,
while others struggle?”
They came up with the answer:
Lovemarks: the future beyond brands
[READ MORE]
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Well done if you do.
But have you ever wondered how and why the recycling symbol was created.
It was designed in 1970 by Gary Anderson as an entry into a design competition.

[READ MORE]

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If you have ever looked at the bottom of a plastic bottle
you may have noticed the triangle symbol with a number in it.
This symbol is important to plastic recyclers to identify
the type of plastic of the packaging.
[READ MORE]

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Home | Twinings
Twinings

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In 1787 Twinings first chose their logo, the capitalised font beneath a lion crest, and have used it continuously ever since. What is more, the company has occupied the same location on London’s Strand since its founding by Thomas Twining in 1706. Tea consumption was not always essential to everyday British life. Coffee, gin, and beer dominated English breakfast drink preferences in the early 18th century.

Tea was officially introduced to England by the young Portuguese wife of Charles II, Catherine of Braganza, in 1662. She served it to her aristocratic friends and soon tea became the fashionable drink of the day.

Thomas Twining was fascinated by the possibilities offered by this fast-growing beverage. He learned well and quickly and by 1706 knew enough to strike out on his own.

After 10 generations, family-owned Twinings is now a globally recognized company, distributing its tea to more than 100 countries worldwide.

1787: Twinings chooses its logo. Today, it is the oldest commercial logo that has been incontinuous use since it was made
1837: Queen Victoria makes Twinings an official Royal Warrant holder
1910: Twinings opens its first shop in France
1933: Twinings first blends its famous English Breakfast
1956: Twinings makes tea bags for the first time
1972: Twinings becomes the first company to win the Queen's Award for Export